Exploring the CBO

Lets start with a simple experiment on what the CBO can do with query optimization. We are going to build on the structure as we go to see if we can help out the CBO with more information.

Test 1) we will start with two tables bigtable and owners and see what plan the CBO comes up with.

Test 2) we will analyze the tables and see what plan the CBO comes up with.

Test 3) we will add primary key and foreign key constraints and see what plan the CBO comes up with.

Test 4) we will add an index on the foreign key constraint and see what plan the CBO comes up with.

 

We know that these two queries are equivalent. So, can the CBO get from query A to query B

A

B

SELECT COUNT(*)

FROM OWNERS O,

BIGTABLE BT

WHERE O.USERNAME = BT.OWNER

and o.username like ‘RL%’;

SELECT COUNT(*)

FROM BIGTABLE BT

WHERE BT.OWNER LIKE ‘RL%’;

 

 

The first pass we are going to use bigtable and owners with no statistics, no indexes and no primary key foreign key restraints.

drop table bigtable;

drop table owners;

create table bigtable as select * from dba_objects;

create table owners as select * from dba_users;

 

alter session set tracefile_identifier = owi_trace;

— This line will generate a trace file of what the CBO did.

alter session set events ‘10053 trace name context forever, level 1’;

 

 

SELECT COUNT(*)

FROM OWNERS O,

BIGTABLE BT

WHERE O.USERNAME = BT.OWNER

and o.username like ‘RL%’;

 

What did the CBO come up with?

 

============

Plan Table

============

—————————————+———————————–+

| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost | Time |

—————————————+———————————–+

| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | | | 437 | |

| 1 | SORT AGGREGATE | | 1 | 15 | | |

| 2 | HASH JOIN | | 62 | 930 | 437 | 00:00:06 |

| 3 | TABLE ACCESS FULL | OWNERS | 1 | 9 | 3 | 00:00:01 |

| 4 | TABLE ACCESS FULL | BIGTABLE| 2398 | 14K | 434 | 00:00:06 |

—————————————+———————————–+

Predicate Information:

———————-

2 – access(“O”.”USERNAME”=”BT”.”OWNER”)

3 – filter(“O”.”USERNAME” LIKE ‘RL%’)

4 – filter(“BT”.”OWNER” LIKE ‘RL%’)

This is intresting, the CBO decided to apply two filters.

 

Well this is not the best execution plan, so lets see what happens when we analyze the tables.

 

analyze table bigtable compute statistics;

analyze table owners compute statistics;

 

alter session set tracefile_identifier = owi_trace;

alter session set events ‘10053 trace name context forever, level 1’;

 

 

SELECT COUNT(*)

FROM OWNERS O,

BIGTABLE BT

WHERE O.USERNAME = BT.OWNER

and o.username like ‘RL%’;

============

Plan Table

============

—————————————+———————————–+

| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost | Time |

—————————————+———————————–+

| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | | | 437 | |

| 1 | SORT AGGREGATE | | 1 | 13 | | |

| 2 | HASH JOIN | | 62 | 806 | 437 | 00:00:06 |

| 3 | TABLE ACCESS FULL | OWNERS | 1 | 8 | 3 | 00:00:01 |

| 4 | TABLE ACCESS FULL | BIGTABLE| 2398 | 12K | 434 | 00:00:06 |

—————————————+———————————–+

Predicate Information:

———————-

2 – access(“O”.”USERNAME”=”BT”.”OWNER”)

3 – filter(“O”.”USERNAME” LIKE ‘RL%’)

4 – filter(“BT”.”OWNER” LIKE ‘RL%’)

 

That was not much help. Lets see what happens when we add in primary key, foreign key restraints.

 

alter table bigtable add constraint bigtable_pk primary key (object_id);

alter table owners add constraint owners_pk primary key (username);

alter table bigtable add constraint bigtable_fk foreign key (owner) references owners(username);

 

alter session set tracefile_identifier = owi_trace;

alter session set events ‘10053 trace name context forever, level 1’;

 

 

SELECT COUNT(*)

FROM OWNERS O,

BIGTABLE BT

WHERE O.USERNAME = BT.OWNER

and o.username like ‘RL%’;

============

Plan Table

============

————————————–+———————————–+

| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost | Time |

————————————–+———————————–+

| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | | | 434 | |

| 1 | SORT AGGREGATE | | 1 | 5 | | |

| 2 | TABLE ACCESS FULL | BIGTABLE| 2398 | 12K | 434 | 00:00:06 |

————————————–+———————————–+

————————————–+———————————–+

Predicate Information:

———————-

2 – filter((“BT”.”OWNER” LIKE ‘RL%’ AND “BT”.”OWNER” IS NOT NULL))

Well this is better. By adding the foreign key constraint, the CBO eliminated the owners table. But we can do better. Let’s add a index on bigtable.owner and see what happens.

 

create index bigtable_idx1 on bigtable(owner);

analyze index bigtable_idx1 compute statistics;

alter session set tracefile_identifier = owi_trace;

alter session set events ‘10053 trace name context forever, level 1’;

 

 

SELECT COUNT(*)

FROM OWNERS O,

BIGTABLE BT

WHERE O.USERNAME = BT.OWNER

and o.username like ‘RL%’;

============
Plan Table
============
------------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost | Time |
------------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | | | 7 | |
| 1 | SORT AGGREGATE | | 1 | 5 | | |
| 2 | INDEX RANGE SCAN | BIGTABLE_IDX1| 2398 | 12K | 7 | 00:00:01 |
------------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+
Predicate Information:
----------------------
2 - access("BT"."OWNER" LIKE 'RL%')
2 - filter(("BT"."OWNER" LIKE 'RL%' AND "BT"."OWNER" IS NOT NULL))

 

Now lets see what the CBO did to get here.
SQL:******* UNPARSED QUERY IS *******

SELECT COUNT(*) “COUNT(*)” FROM “OPS$ORACLE”.”OWNERS” “O”,”OPS$ORACLE”.”BIGTABLE” “BT” WHERE “BT”.”OWNER”=”O”.”USERNAME” AND “O”.”USERNAME” LIKE ‘RL%’

JE: eliminate table: OWNERS (O)

JE: Replaced column: O.USERNAME with column: BT.OWNER

Registered qb: SEL$84E079A4 0xadec2578 (JOIN REMOVED FROM QUERY BLOCK SEL$1; SEL$1; “O”@”SEL$1”)

**************************

Predicate Move-Around (PM)

**************************

PM: PM bypassed: Outer query contains no views.

PM: PM bypassed: Outer query contains no views.

query block SEL$84E079A4 (#0) unchanged

FPD: Considering simple filter push in query block SEL$84E079A4 (#0)

“BT”.”OWNER” IS NOT NULL AND “BT”.”OWNER” LIKE ‘RL%’

try to generate transitive predicate from check constraints for query block SEL$84E079A4 (#0)

finally: “BT”.”OWNER” IS NOT NULL AND “BT”.”OWNER” LIKE ‘RL%’

Final query after transformations:******* UNPARSED QUERY IS *******

SELECT COUNT(*) “COUNT(*)” FROM “OPS$ORACLE”.”BIGTABLE” “BT” WHERE “BT”.”OWNER” IS NOT NULL AND “BT”.”OWNER” LIKE ‘RL%’

Well that’s special. The CBO came up with a query that is close to query B.

 

B

C

SELECT COUNT(*)

FROM BIGTABLE BT

WHERE BT.OWNER ‘RL%’;

SELECT COUNT(*) “COUNT(*)” FROM “OPS$ORACLE”.”BIGTABLE” “BT” WHERE “BT”.”OWNER” IS NOT NULL AND “BT”.”OWNER” LIKE ‘RL%’
The only real difference between query B and query C is the CBO added bt.owner is not null. This is curious because if we are looking for where owner like ‘RL%’ then by definition owner would be not null.
What did we learn?

1) When we only have tables with no supporting structures the CBO selected full table scans on the two tables then did a hash join.

2) When we analyzed the tables to get good statistics, the CBO still did full table scans and a hash join.

3) When we added in the primary key foreign key constraints, the CBO knew that if bigtable.owner existed then there was a matching row in owners.username. Because of this, the CBO was able to eliminate the join condition bt.owner = o.username and eliminate the owners table from the query. This got us a full table scan on bigtable.

4) When we added the index on bigtable.owner the CBO decided an index range scan on bigtable_idx1 would return the correct results. This is because all the information needed to satisfy the query.

 

This entry was posted in Cost Based Optimizer, Database Stuff by rlockard. Bookmark the permalink.

About rlockard

Robert Lockard is a professional Oracle Designer, Developer and DBA working in the world of financial intelligence. In 1987 his boss called him into his office and told him that he is now their Oracle Wizard then handed him a stack of Oracle tapes and told him to load it on the VAX. Sense then, Robert has worked exclusively as an Oracle database designer, developer and Database Administrator. Robert enjoys flying vintage aircraft, racing sailboats, photography, and technical diving. Robert owns and fly’s the “Spirit of Baltimore Hon” a restored 1948 Ryan Navion and lives in Glen Burnie Maryland on Marley Creek

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